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there in connecticut. if we do not stand together, we ought to throw it out the window and protect american citizens. if we cannot do that, we have failed as an american people. host: what kind of gun do you own? caller: i have a shotgun, a rifle, and a pistol. i used to keep them in the house. i don't have them in the house no more. to me, you know, and i love hunting, but assault weapons -- it just has no business. host: have you ever been a member of the nra? caller: no, never been a member of the nra. host: from our facebook page, jess says -- jeff says -- nicholas, what kind of gun do you have? caller: i have two fire armas, an ak-47, and an ar-15 bought as recently as yesterday. host: why did you buy one yesterday? caller: i have wanted one for some time but just didn't. in anticipation of a ban, i made the decision to go out and purchase one. that being said, i want to say i am in favor of huge increases in gun-control law. i think one of the things that is most disturbing to me is to hear fear mongering on both sides of the conversation whether it is coming from anti- gun or pro-gun individu
and work at these nonprofits. it is an economic generator in this town. host: jim from connecticut, republican line. caller: i have two questions. first, if there is no agreement by the december 31st deadline, can the congress act in such a way that any change in the law would be retroactive to january 1, 2013? do you believe the congress will consider solving for the individual taxpayer instead of the lobbyists? how do we get that turned around? guest: my answer to the upper question now, whether or not they can retroactively take on some of these issues so they do not pass it they can go on in postdate, that is something that have done quite often in terms of tax extensions in different bills where they will pass in february but it will be effective until january. host: industries benefiting most from this issue in terms of lobbying against sequestration in this issue of the fiscal cliff. education, health care, civil service and public officials. our last call joining us from buffalo, new york, good morning. caller: are you there? host: please, go ahead. caller: i am 21 years ol
us on the democratic line from connecticut. caller: good morning. my question is, in watching c- span over the years, i noticed there was once an episode where an economist talked-about a world view on reducing the imprint of the military and using limited black ops and to intervene in situations to quell unrest in the discos along with the things like the economy -- this goes along with things like the economy. my question is how do you see us going black ops and the cia? is this not what we did in afghanistan? guest: i understand there is a very wrong perception among the public that all special ops do are black ops and unilateral raids in the dead of night. that perception is widely held. in the case of columbia, the philippines, yemen, these other places that i am talking about, the governments have invited special operations forces in to help them, to help their country's forces. that is why i think it is such an effective use in the long term. it does not cause the same political diplomatic controversy as many people know what happened after the bin laden rate. it was a huge rup
Search Results 0 to 2 of about 3